Light screen

Recently, I moved house. In this home, every space has one wall that’s seventy percent antique single-glazing and thirty percent inactive radiator. My interior lamps are direct competitors to overhanging street lights. They compete over darkness. Together, they are both winners. Light is always.

In bright sunshine, my laptop-screen turns blurry and my smartphone’s brightness cannot beat the sun-ray’s reflections. A day like that and it’s immediately difficult to look at any screen at all.

This year’s first card reached its receiver on a clear winter day. To make sure he’d head outside, to screen people and streets, I could not other than send him something to fold over his laptop. With light and darkness, who’s first decides who is who. I wanted him to be first.

To search and see light beyond a screen.

 

Advertisements

Shedding New Light On Things

The first Salone night is spent at the Venture Lambrate, a new area in Milan’s North-East outskirts, dedicated to 236 designers on a total of 5,000 square meters of exhibition space. But it doesn’t feel like an ordinary exhibition. Instead, it feels like a well-kept secret jungle when you’re meandering through people, buildings, rooms, gardens and over stairs, rooftops and zebra-crossings.


We stumbled upon the launch of Castor, a multidisciplinary design bureau from Canada, that is about to storm the European design charts. Their Invisible Chandelier is made out of a unique collection of (old-fashioned) halogen light-bulbs, whereas the light itself comes from a LED-filled board, placed on top of the bulbs.

As often the case with good design: it looks simple, yet is complicated. So far, the designers behind Castor managed to give a new life to old guitar samplers, phone cords, fire extinguishers, exhaust pipes and car-headlights. This way those (re-)usables can now shed some new light on things.

Of course I now feel as if I will be able to draw up a comparable miracle of a chandelier in my own home. Therefore, I will start collecting, no, hoarding, old light-bulbs from today onwards. So you know where to send them. What else do you think could use a new life in a lamp?