Zen And The Art Of Eating Noodles

As a Dutchie, I always feel as if the Dutch don’t have a very strong food culture. By that I mean that we lack those rituals, entrenched in our daily lives to such an extent that they shape our routines. Food is fuel.

Of course, the Dutch do have their ways around food, when you really look into the subject matter. But it doesn’t measure up to the art of dedication the Japanese put in their food, and their subsequent almost spiritual consumption. If you haven’t heard of it yet, Tampopo (which literally translates as ‘dandelion’) is a stunning and sometimes (to me) incomprehensible movie about food.

Actually, it is about noodles. Although this might not immediately raise your curiosity, to me it served as an introduction to a totally different take on food.

Watch this scene and you’ll never mindlessly slurp your noodles again. 

3 thoughts on “Zen And The Art Of Eating Noodles

  1. “As a Dutchie, I always feel as if the Dutch don’t have a very strong food culture. By that I mean that we lack those rituals, entrenched in our daily lives to such an extent that they shape our routines. Food is fuel.”

    I feel the same way about American food “culture”…

    I would not have expected such a statement from a European as I too have strong European ties which have allowed me to see just how powerful a culture surrounding food can be. Maybe the Dutch have been too saturated by American culture?

    As for the movie clip…if we had a world where everyone viewed food in this way, we would have a much more sustainable and compassionate home.

    • Compared to i.e. the French and Italian cuisine, I have not discovered a distinct taste-distinction within the Dutch kitchen that is as widely adapted as other European taste-makers, which does not mean there are no traditional dishes (we love potatoes). And the Dutch have been positively influenced by other European cuisines, as well as by their immigrant-cuisines (Turkish, Indonesian and Surinam food, for instance), which I embrace in my cooking habits.

      The point of my post is actually represented in your last sentence, so thank you for sharing – and try to see the whole movie. It’s intriguing.

  2. Pingback: Tampopo Revisited | Living Antenna

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